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Doing Well at School

  • Try your best at school. It's important to how you feel about yourself.

  • Ask for help when you need it.

  • Join clubs and teams, church groups, and friends for activities after school.

  • Tell kids who pick on you or try to hurt you to stop bothering you. Then walk away.

  • Tell adults you trust about bullies.

Playing It Safe

  • Wear your seat belt at all times in the car.

    Use a booster seat if the seat belt does not fit you yet.

  • Sit in the back seat until you are 13. It is the safest place.

  • Wear your helmet for biking, skating, and skateboarding.

  • Always wear the right safety equipment for your activities.

  • Never swim alone.

  • Use sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher when out in the sun.

  • Have friends over only when your parents say it's OK.

  • Ask to go home if you are uncomfortable with things at someone else's house or a party.

  • Avoid being with kids who suggest risky or harmful things to do.

  • Know that no older child or adult has the right to ask to see or touch your private parts, or to scare you.

Eating Well, Being Active

  • Eat breakfast every day. It helps learning.

  • Aim for eating 5 fruits and vegetables every day.

  • Drink 3 cups of low-fat milk or water instead of soda pop or juice drinks.

  • Limit high-fat foods and drinks such as candies, snacks, fast food, and soft drinks.

  • Eat with your family often.

  • Talk with a doctor or nurse about plans for weight loss or using supplements.

  • Plan and get at least 1 hour of active exercise every day.

  • Limit TV and computer time to 2 hours a day.

Healthy Teeth

  • Brush your teeth at least twice each day, morning and night.

  • Floss your teeth every day.

  • Wear your mouth guard when playing sports.

Growing and Developing

  • Ask a parent or trusted adult questions about changes in your body.

  • Talking is a good way to handle anger, disappointment, worry, and feeling sad.

  • Everyone gets angry.

    • Stay calm.

    • Listen and talk through it.

    • Try to understand the other person's point of view.

  • Don't stay friends with kids who ask you to do scary or harmful things.

  • It's OK to have up-and-down moods, but if you feel sad most of the time, talk to us.

  • Know why you say “No!” to drugs, alcohol, tobacco, and sex.

© 2010 American Academy of Pediatrics

Growth and Development



Bright Futures Patient Handout: 9 and 10 Year Visits

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School

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Nutrition and Physical Activity

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Development and Mental Health